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Mapathon
FAQ

What is the Wild Green Mapathon?

The Wild Green Mapathon is a partnership between Wild Green Future and the Global Road Map at James Cook University. Roads systems are rapidly expanding into rainforest regions across the island of Borneo, opening new areas of the island to logging and agriculture, such as palm oil plantations. The success of conservation efforts in the region rely heavily on knowing where these roads are, and accurately predicting where they will be built next. Global Road Map is using volunteers to trace the new roads on publicly available satellite imagery, allowing researchers and conservationists to understand more fully where their work is most needed.

The Wild Green Mapathon is a means of building awareness of the issues undocumented roads create, and a way of generating the volunteer community necessary to map the roads. Volunteers can map roads, earn limited edition stickers, and compete for a spot on our leaderboard. Additionally, Global Road Map will donate $1 AUD to Bornean conservation for every 100 km² block mapped.

What are the system requirements?

A computer capable of running Google Earth Pro is required to participate. You can read the system requirements for the program here!

Can mapping be done via phone?

The mapping process cannot currently be done via phone.

Can I use GIS or another program instead of Google Earth?

Participation is currently limited to Google Earth Pro.

Where can I sign up?

You can join by going to our Mapathon page and entering your information into the form. You can also expect an email from a Global Road Map researcher within 24 hours.

 

What is the data collection process and what is this map useful for?

Roads created by loggers, market hunters, and agriculture interests are already visible on publicly available satellite imagery. Volunteers compile the paths of these roads into a mapping database by tracing them on Google Earth Pro. The compiled information helps further conservation by allowing scientists to understand the impacts of the roads, see trends in regional development, and to predict where the roads will be built next.

How long does it last?

There are 3,163 blocks of imagery left to trace as of the start of the Mapathon, and it will continue until they have all been completed.   

 

Where can I find out more?
You can find out more about Global Road Map at their website, linked here.

The current standings can be found on our Mapathon page, here.

Volunteer information and tutorials can be found here
 

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